The fight against climate change starts with women — The fight against climate change starts with women

of emigration and marriages

by Marco Andreozzi

It is known that our planet has experienced a markedly different period of climate change in recent decades, also due to the doubling of the world population over half a century. One result of the ongoing global warming is the greater variability of atmospheric phenomena of less predictability and greater impact. In the case of floods on coastal lands, also caused by the intensified settlements close to the sea, the problems caused by the high frequency of catastrophic events affect developing countries such as China, the Philippines and India. In the African countries, however, a certain increase in drought is a disturbing phenomenon, as in Ethiopia or Kenya.

A recent article by The Economist (‘Survival of the bookish’, or the survival of those who read and study) deals with this topic in the very interesting perspective of the correlation of education and climate. In summary, an inverse analytical relationship between a country’s average educational attainment – particularly the high school graduation rate – and its weakness for climate change (1 = most vulnerable), from data sets 2019-2021, and therefore very recent and meaningful. For example, in the Far East, Malaysia has over 60% schooling a weakness of just over 0.35, while the lowest Thai schooling at 35% has a weakness of over 0.4. Moving to the ‘sub-continent’, the figures for India are 25% and 0.5, while in Nepal the school at 15% implies a weakness higher (but slightly) than 0.5. In Africa, Kenya correlates its schooling nearly 25% with a slightly pejorative weakness compared to Nepal, while Ethiopia below 10% correlates schooling with a score above 0.55.

But there is more. The article focuses on the importance of mothers with a certain level of schooling as a critical factor for the best response to adverse events related to changing climatic conditions compared to a healthier growth of children. This is due to the best level of widespread knowledge about nutrition, hygiene and the use of appropriate medical treatments (superstitions and beliefs of traditional medicine are very often useless and, in some cases, harmful). In short, the article underscores the importance of women’s schooling and the need to invest in this front as a more efficient allocation of public resources (therefore scarce) compared to infrastructural investments for adaptation and defense of phenomena associated with change connected.climatic.

It is a very interesting point to connect with other well-known studies that clearly identify correlations between female participation in the labor force and GDP. Among the rich countries, Norway and Switzerland are at the top, over 62% (actually very high GDP per capita), Canada and the Netherlands 59%, United Kingdom 58% and Germany 56%, France at 50%, just below the EU -Average. Italy is close to 40%, with the US 55% and Japan 53% (G-7 countries). Since 1990, Dutch and German data have grown by more than sixteen and ten percentage points respectively, which explains a lot. Italy seems to have missed the contribution of women with economic growth since the new millennium at – 20% compared to the average of the rest of the EU. In short, believing more in women for a better future around the planet is scientific. Besides, who has ever heard of female dictators?

of emigration and marriages

by Marco Andreozzi

It is well known that in recent decades there has been a markedly different period of climate change on our planet, also due to the doubling of the world population over half a century. One result of the ongoing progressive global warming is the enhanced variability of weather phenomena of less predictability and greater impact. In the case of floods on coastal lands, also confused by intensified settlements close to the sea, the problems of the higher frequency of catastrophic events affect developing countries, such as China, the Philippines and India. In Africa, there is a certain increase in drought, which is instead the disturbing phenomenon, as in Ethiopia or Kenya.

A recent article in The Economist (‘Survival of the bookish’) discusses this topic from the very interesting perspective of the correlation of education and climate. In summary, an inverse analytical relationship between a country’s average educational attainment – particularly the upper secondary school graduation rate – and its climate change vulnerability score (1 = most vulnerable) was mapped from aggregated 2019-2021 data, ie very recent and meaningful. Exempli gratia, in the Far East, Malaysia over 60% schooling reports a weakness of just over 0.35, while Thailand sees the lowest schooling at 35% a weakness of over 0.4. Moving to the “sub-continent”, India’s numbers are 25% and 0.5, while in Nepal, schooling at 15% implies a weakness over (even if slightly) 0.5. In Africa, Kenya school education correlates just below 25% with slightly worse weaknesses than Nepal, while Ethiopia explains education below 10% with a weakness score above 0.55.

But there is more. The article focuses on the importance of mothers with education as a critical factor in raising a better response to adverse events related to climate change, with reference to healthier children. This is due to the better level of knowledge about nutrition, hygiene, and the use of appropriate medical care (superstitions and traditional medical beliefs often prove unnecessary and, in some cases, harmful). In short, the article underlines the importance of women’s schools and the need to invest on this front as a more efficient allocation of public (i.e. scarce) resources such as infrastructural investment and adaptation and defense against phenomena affecting climate change.

This is a very interesting point to connect with other well-known studies that clearly identify correlations between female labor market participation and GDP. Among the rich countries, Norway and Switzerland are at the top, over 62% (actually very high GDP per capita), Canada and the Netherlands 59%, the United Kingdom 58% and Germany 56%, with France at 50% just below the EU average . Italy is close to 40%, with the US 55% and Japan 53% (other G-7 countries). Since 1990, the Dutch and German figures have grown by more than sixteen and ten percentage points respectively, which explains a lot. Italy seems to be missing precisely the contribution of women with economic growth since the new millennium at -20% compared to the average for the rest of the EU. In short, believing more in women for a better future on the planet is scientific. Also, who has ever heard of female dictators?

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